Author Topic: United States presidential election, 2016  (Read 14209 times)

SHANDAL

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United States presidential election, 2016
« on: February 04, 2016, 10:19:57 PM »
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 04:51:02 AM by SHANDAL »

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2016, 05:17:00 AM »

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 05:17:56 AM »

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 05:29:32 AM »
Can Sanders hold his own on national security?

Sanders has sought to demonstrate his knowledge on foreign policy and show that he’s a well-rounded candidate. But he often reverts to his stump speech, which is heavy on the economy.


He frequently hammers Clinton over her 2002 vote as a senator to authorize the Iraq War as a way of questioning the former secretary of State’s foreign policy judgment. But strategists say he can’t continue to rely on that one attack line and needs to define his own credibility on national security issues.

“His whole message there is the Iraq War, and that’s a long time ago,” Democratic political consultant Mike Fraioli said. “He seems to focus on that vote in terms of big-picture stuff. It’s a legitimate kind of a Johnny-one-note.”

Sanders will need to find a way to make the case that he’ll be a competent commander in chief over a candidate with Clinton’s experience.

“He has to do something to make himself more credible on those issues,” Bannon said. “If I was advising Hillary Clinton, I would tell her to focus very much on national security issues. That’s what’s pushing her candidacy right now and hurting Bernie.”

How does each candidate appeal to independents?

New Hampshire has an open primary system, which means voters registered as independents can choose to participate in either the Democratic or Republican primary.

Strategists say that while they are uncertain how independents will vote in this election, Clinton and Sanders should appeal to this voter bloc that could have a hand in propelling them to victory.

Appealing to independents, strategists say, will come down to Sanders’s case for a political revolution versus Clinton’s experience.

“If I was advising the Sanders campaign, I would make the argument that politics is broken and if you want to fix the political system, come vote for Sanders,” said Democratic strategist Craig Varoga. “If I was advising Clinton, I would make the argument that politics is broken and we need somebody who can walk across party lines … equipped to be president on the first day in office.”

Clinton has the cards stacked against her in the Granite State, but some view that as an opportunity for her to frame herself as a candidate who won’t back down from a tough fight.

“I don’t see her going in as a front-runner, but saying, ‘I’m here and fighting and I’m going to keep fighting.’ New Hampshire might find that appealing,” said Joe Trippi, campaign manager for Howard Dean’s White House bid in 2004. “It’s about showing she’s willing to fight even though she’s down big and [there is] not a whole lot of chance closing the gap.”

Does Sanders look beyond New Hampshire?

While Sanders has a significant advantage going into New Hampshire, he faces a longer-term problem as he seeks the nomination.

He easily surpasses Clinton in Granite State polls and lives in a neighboring state, but she fares much better among minority voters, who will make up more of the electorate in upcoming contests.

“I kind of expect both of them to kind of reach out beyond New Hampshire in the debate,” Trippi said. “Bernie Sanders is not performing well with minorities at all in South Carolina. I’d be surprised if he doesn’t try to speak out on some issues to try to reach those voters.”

After Iowa, which Republicans do they go after?

Some strategists suggest steering clear of the GOP primary and letting it play out, while others think it’s a good way to contrast the parties on important issues.

Bannon pointed to Donald Trump and Ted Cruz as examples.

“Trump makes such an incredibly good boogie man, you can’t ignore him,” he said. “Cruz goes in the same category as Trump. That’s how you scare Democrats.”

But after Marco Rubio’s strong third-place finish in the Iowa Republican caucuses, about 1 percentage point behind Trump, Democrats are turning their attention to the Florida senator.

“Rubio has a window to win in New Hampshire. I would go after him too,” Bannon said. “I don’t think many Democrats know who he is, and he’s a big player in New Hampshire, so I think you got to include him.”

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 07:32:23 PM »
Hillary Clinton stands on stage during a CNN town hall last night in New Hampshire, where she and rival Bernie Sanders made personal digs in a bid to woo voters.

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 07:33:02 PM »

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2016, 01:45:38 AM »
Poll: Sanders nearly tied with Clinton nationwide

 Chris Keane/Reuters U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders takes a selfie with supporters after a campaign rally at the South Carolina Democratic Party headquarters in Columbia, South Carolina November 21, 2015. REUTERS/Chris…
Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders has dramatically cut into the nationwide lead of primary rival Hillary Clinton, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll.

The poll released Friday finds Clinton leading the race with 44 percent support, compared to 42 percent support for Sanders, within the survey's margin of error.

The last iteration of the poll in December had Clinton leading Sanders nationwide 61–30.

“Democrats nationwide are feeling the Bern as Sen. Bernie Sanders closes a 31-point gap to tie Secretary Hillary Clinton,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll.

The poll also finds that Sanders matches up better with top Republican primary candidates than Clinton.

In head-to-head matchups, the Vermont senator leads GOP front-runner Donald Trump by 10 points, edges Ted Cruz by 4 points and ties Marco Rubio.

While Clinton still tops Trump by 5 points, she ties Cruz and trails Rubio by 7 points.

The poll also finds that Clinton has a net favorability rating of negative 17, only besting Trump in that category, who has a negative-25 favorability rating.

Sanders has a 9-point favorability rating nationwide, only trailing Rubio, at 14 points.

The poll surveyed 484 Democrats and has a margin of error of 4.5 percent.

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2016, 01:49:14 AM »
Barbara Bush Throws Shade At Donald Trump

© ASSOCIATED PRESS Barbara Bush, right, jokes with her son, Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, while introducing him at a town hall meeting at West Running Brook Middle School in Derry, N.H., Thursday Feb. 4…
Barbara Bush, who once said she thought there had been "enough Bushes" in the White House, is no longer apprehensive about her son Jeb's Republican presidential bid.

But the former first lady did have some advice for him in an interview with CBS's Norah O'Donnell that aired Friday morning.

"He's got the same values that America seems to have lost. ... He's almost too polite," Bush said. "I don't advise him, but if I gave him advice, I would say, 'Why don't you interrupt like the other people do?'"



"I've gotten better at interrupting, Mom, come on," Jeb Bush responded. Bush is indeed trying to interrupt more in the primary debates.

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2016, 01:48:47 AM »
“It’s not a Trump tie — they make those in China,” Rubio said.


Rubio’s strategists see nothing to be gained by engaging in a war of words with Trump until the field narrows, since no candidate has so far been able to claim lasting success fighting him.

“When the time comes and it’s appropriate, we’ll do so,” Rubio told reporters when asked about taking on Trump more forcefully.

For now, Rubio’s anti-Trump messaging has been more passive, saying that “anger is not a plan.”

Rubio has been more willing to engage Christie, Kasich and Bush, who must do well in New Hampshire to stand a realistic chance of competing for the nomination. Recent polls show Rubio leading them in the state, but not by a wide margin.

The candidate Rubio has hit hardest is Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.), whom his advisers see as a competitor for many of the same voters. Cruz and his campaign have shown a “willingness to say or do anything” to win, Rubio said.

Rubio’s growing crowds have been welcome news for his campaign, but there have been some awkward moments. A big and boisterous audience cheered Rubio as he entered an Exeter rally — only to have to wait for him to do a TV interview there before he would address them, frustrating some attendees. A day later, he abruptly paused meeting a long line of supporters waiting to see him so he could do another television appearance.

Rubio’s unity pitch is attracting a more diverse slate of Republicans to his events — and sometimes their views are at odds with one another. At a town hall here in Laconia Wednesday, Rubio was asked two questions about immigration from opposing perspectives.

One man explained that he employs an undocumented immigrant named Fernando who otherwise obeys the laws. The man said wanted to figure out a way to “legitimize” people like Fernando.

Rubio said he sympathized with Fernando’s story, but “I also sympathize with the American people, who have to bear the burden of people coming into this country illegally.”

Vince Merola, 77, of Wolfeboro, asked Rubio why he joined the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” that pushed comprehensive immigration reform after running for the Senate opposing “amnesty.”

Rubio denied that he ever went back on his word to oppose “blanket amnesty.” But Merola wasn’t swayed.

“I think he means what he’s saying right now. But will he cave when the party tells him ‘We can’t do that, we’ll lose votes,’ ” wondered Merola, who is leaning toward supporting Cruz.

As Rubio’s support grows, his team will also confront the challenge of preparing a large roster of surrogates to give him crisp support. In a painful Thursday interview with MSNBC, new backer Rick Santorum struggled to point to any major accomplishments Rubio achieved in the Senate.

Saturday’s debate, which will effectively be the last chance to reach a wide audience before Tuesday’s vote, is expected to be nasty. For Christie, Kasich and Bush, in particular, it could be the last real chance to prevent their supporters from straying to Rubio.

Rubio is bracing for a ferocious give and take. He will not be able to avoid a confrontation the way he has on the campaign trail. In Pittsfield, he tried on a firefighter's jacket after a town hall, aware of the looming clash.

“I may have to wear this at the debate,” he said.

SHANDAL

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Re: United States presidential election, 2016
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2016, 09:28:32 PM »
Winners and losers from the New Hampshire Republican debate
The Republican candidates for president took the stage for their latest debate Saturday night in Manchester, N.H., just three days before the second contest of the 2016 nominating contest — the New Hampshire primary.



Donald Trump leads the state by a wide margin, while a cluster of GOP candidates are fighting for second place. And much of the action Thursday was among the latter.

Below, The Fix's winners and losers.

 

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