Author Topic: RARE PICS AND STORIES  (Read 14118 times)

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2012, 09:51:49 AM »


Mary was a five-ton Asian elephant who performed in the Sparks World Famous Shows circus. Her death is sometimes interpreted as a cautionary tale of circus animal abuse during the early twentieth century.
 
On September 11, 1916, a hotel wor
ker named Red Eldridge was hired as an assistant elephant trainer by the circus. On the evening of September 12 he was killed by Mary in Kingsport, Tennessee, while taking her to a nearby pond to splash and drink. There have been several accounts of his death. One, recounted by W.H. Coleman who claimed to be a witness, is that he prodded her behind the ear with a hook after she reached down to nibble on a watermelon rind. She went into a rage, snatched Eldridge with her trunk, threw him against a drink stand and stepped on his head, crushing it. A contemporary newspaper account, from the Johnson City Staff, said that Mary "collided its trunk vice-like [sic] about [Eldridge's] body, lifted him 10 feet in the air, then dashed him with fury to the ground... and with the full force of her biestly [sic] fury is said to have sunk her giant tusks entirely through his body. The animal then trampled the dying form of Eldridge as if seeking a murderous triumph, then with a sudden... swing of her massive foot hurled his body into the crowd
 
The details of the aftermath are confused in a maze of sensationalist newspaper stories and folklore. Most accounts indicate that she calmed down afterward and didn't charge the onlookers, who began chanting, "Kill the elephant!" Within minutes, local blacksmith Hench Cox tried to kill Mary, firing five rounds with little effect.[1] Meanwhile, the leaders of several nearby towns threatened not to allow the circus to visit if Mary was included. The circus owner, Charlie Sparks, reluctantly decided that the only way to quickly resolve the potentially ruinous situation was to kill the elephant in public. On the following day, a foggy and rainy September 13, 1916, she was transported by rail to Erwin, Tennessee, where a crowd of over 2,500 people (including most of the town's children) assembled in the Clinchfield Railroad yard.
 
The elephant was hanged by the neck from a railcar-mounted industrial crane. The first attempt resulted in a snapped chain, causing Mary to fall and break her hip as dozens of children fled in terror. The severely wounded elephant died during a second attempt and was buried beside the tracks. Although the authenticity of a widely distributed (and heavily retouched) photo of her death was disputed years later by Argosy magazine, other photographs taken during the incident confirm its provenance
 
Source:
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_%28elephant%29
 
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Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2012, 09:53:17 AM »

Gandhi was not always the peaceful man he is well-known for being " in fact, he was never a pure pacifist in that he allowed for violence as a last resort. In his middle ages he volunteered to fight in three wars: The Boer War, The Zulu War
, and World War I. Furthermore, after an attack by Muslims on Hindus he approved of the governments order to shoot ten Muslims for every Hindu that was killed. In a famous statement about independence, Gandhi said: "If a fight is inevitable I would expect every son of the soil to contribute his mite  I would not flinch from sacrificing a million lives for Indias liberty. ť
 During the freedom struggle, he wore nothing but a loin cloth, but for years he lived in London and used to wear a silk hat and spats and carried a cane .
 
Source :
http://www.gandhiserve.org/video/mahatma/commentary07.html
 
« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 09:54:27 AM by Charanjeet Singh Zira »

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2012, 09:55:56 AM »


Kabul: When she refused to prostitute herself or have sex with the man she was forced to marry when she was about 13, officials said, Sahar Gul's in-laws tortured her and threw her into a dirty, windowless cellar for months until the police
 discovered her lying in hay and animal dung.
 
In July, an appeals court upheld prison sentences of 10 years each for three of her in-laws, a decision heralded as a legal triumph underscoring the advances for women's rights in the past decade. She is recovering from her wounds, physical and emotional, in a women's shelter in Kabul.
 
But to many rights advocates, Sahar Gul's case, which drew attention from President Hamid Karzai and the international news media, is the exception that proves the rule: a small victory that masks a still-depressing picture of widespread instances of abuse of women that never come to light.

Further, advocacy groups fear that even the tentative progress that has been achieved in protecting some women could be undone if the West's focus on Afghanistan now begins to shift away as NATO troops withdraw and the international money pumped into the economy diminishes.
 
"If you take away that funding and pressure, it is not sustainable," said Heather Barr, Afghanistan researcher for Human Rights Watch.

As more details of Sahar Gul's case have come to light - including the fact that the abuse continued even as, time and again, neighbors, police officers and her family members voiced suspicions that something was wrong - it has only reinforced how vulnerable women and girls still are in Afghanistan, particularly in rural areas where under-age marriages are common and forced ones are typical.
 
Sahar Gul, who is now about 14, grew up in Badakhshan, a poor, mountainous province in the north. As a young child she was shuffled around after her father died, ending up with her stepbrother, Mohammad, when she was about 9. She helped with the hard work - tending cows, sheep and an orchard of walnut and apricot trees, and making dung bricks for the fire - but her stepbrother's wife resented her presence. The woman pressured Mohammad to give Sahar Gul up for marriage after he was contacted by a man, about 30, named Ghulam Sakhi - even though she had not yet reached the legal marriage age of 16, or 15 with a father's consent.

In effect, Ghulam Sakhi bought her: he paid at least $5,000, according to government officials and prosecutors, an illegal exchange. He drove off with Sahar Gul to his parents' home in Baghlan, another northern province hundreds of miles away.
 
Ghulam Sakhi's first wife had fled after he and his mother beat her for not bearing children, according to Rahima Zarifi, the chairwoman of Baghlan's women's affairs department, and the mullah in the mosque in the town in Baghlan. In his search for a new wife, there may have been a reason Ghulam Sakhi's family looked so far afield: they intended to force her into prostitution, according to Ms. Zarifi, who followed the case closely, and officials at the Ministry of Women's Affairs in Kabul.
 
In Baghlan, the girl was immediately put to work cooking and cleaning, but she was able to resist consummating the marriage for weeks.

She ran away to the house of a neighbor, who alerted both the police and her husband's family. Ghulam Sakhi's neighbors and the police forced him to sign a letter promising not to mistreat Sahar Gul, though they let him take her back.
 
The warning had little effect. One day, when she complained of a headache, her mother-in-law, Siyamoi, tricked her into taking a sedative that she thought was medicine, said Mushtari Daqiq, the acting executive director of the aid group Women for Afghan Women and also Sahar Gul's lawyer.

"When she woke up in the morning, she realized she had been used by her husband," Ms. Daqiq said.
 
A neighbor named Ehsanullah said that one evening last summer, as his family ate dinner, they heard screaming coming from the house. The following morning his mother called at the house. He recounted what she saw: "Sahar Gul had lost a lot of weight, her hands were covered with bruises and wounds, one of her hands was broken, but her mother-in-law was forcing her to do the laundry." He added, "She kept her head down the whole time my mother was there."
 
After a group of elders confronted Ghulam Sakhi, the screaming stopped.
 
Frustrated that the girl could not perform the housework they expected, the family put her in the cellar, where she slept on the floor without a mattress, her hands and feet tied with rope. She was given only bread and water to eat. She was also beaten regularly. According to Sahar Gul and Ms. Daqiq, most of the beatings were at the hand of Amanullah, Ghulam Sakhi's elderly father.
 
They described grotesque crimes, accusing Amanullah of hitting Sahar Gul with sticks, biting her chest, inserting hot irons in her ears and vagina, and pulling out two fingernails.
 
"She was helpless," Ms. Daqiq said. "She had no hope for her life."
 
Sahar Gul's uncle Khwaja, who lived nearby in the same province, and her stepbrother, Mohammad, tried to visit her a few times, but the family told them the girl was not home. The family then threatened Mohammad, warning that he had illegally given his sister to be married. "He had to accept and run back to Badakhshan without meeting his sister," Khwaja said.
 Then, last December, about six months after the marriage, they finally got to see her when they called at the house with two police officers and heard a voice coming from the cellar.
 
"In the light of our flashlight, we found Sahar Gul lying on a pile of hay," said Shirullah, one of the police officers.
 Her dress was in rags, she was barely conscious and she could not stand after weeks in the dark.
 "She was constantly moaning," Shirullah said. "She was in a horrible situation. She couldn't move her body parts, and we carried her to the hospital in our arms."
 
Ms. Zarifi and three nurses washed her and gave her soup and dates. "When she saw the food, she became very excited," Ms. Zarifi said.
 
The police arrested the mother-in-law, Siyamoi, her daughter Mahkhurd and finally Amanullah, the father-in-law - who was discovered hiding in a burqa and a blanket.
 
The family told the police that Ghulam Sakhi was in the Afghan Army in Helmand. That was later found to be untrue, according to local residents and Afghan officials, but the claim bought enough time for him to slip away from the authorities along with his brother, Darmak. They remain at large.
 
With her mistreatment a big story in the Afghan news media, Mr. Karzai called for swift justice. In a district court in Kabul on May 1, the judge, speaking in front of a bank of microphones on national television, declared Sahar Gul's three in-laws guilty.
 
According to neighbors and to officials who heard the in-laws' arguments in court, they acted the way they did mostly because they felt they had paid good money for a girl who they said was not pretty, who misbehaved and who would neither work as they demanded nor bear them children.
 
Lawyers for the family members say that they deny beating or drugging Sahar Gul, and that her wounds were self-inflicted. They deny confining her in the cellar, and say they had no plans to send her into prostitution. The prostitution accusation was not addressed in court.
 
The lawyers, who were provided by the legal group Da Qanoon Ghushtonky, or Demanders of Law, which is financed by international aid, argue that the political outcry caused the trial to be rushed through without due process.
 
Rather than showing the lack of legal protections for women, they argued, Sahar Gul's case underscores the weakness of Afghanistan's still-developing legal system, one that can easily be swayed by politicians like Mr. Karzai.
 
Siyamoi and Mahkhurd are now 2 of 171 prisoners in a women's prison in Kabul. On a recent morning there, the two women insisted they were innocent and railed ferociously at their accusers.
 
"We are being cheated by the court," Siyamoi said. "If you think I am a criminal, why don't you pull out my fingernails?"
 
A few miles away across Kabul, Sahar Gul lives in a shelter provided by Women for Afghan Women, one of seven shelters the organization has established nationally for abuse victims since it was founded in 2007.
 
Sahar Gul played in the sun in the garden in a golden dress and purple shawl and pink bracelets, a round-cheeked, gangly girl.
 
She had made a new friend at the shelter, a 14-year-old girl whose face was scarred by acid by a sister's thwarted suitor.
 
Sahar Gul still bears the scars and bruises of her ordeal, but her caregivers said she was recovering and becoming gradually more independent. She said she had ambitions.
 
"I want to become a politician and stop other women suffering the same," she said.
 
Now, however, rights groups fear that schools and clinics for girls may close as international money dries up and the political climate in Afghanistan becomes more religiously conservative, undermining the fragile lattice of pro-women support groups, government ministries and nongovernmental organizations as well as laws specifically created in the past few years to protect women.
 
A new 2009 law to eliminate violence against women was cited in the sentencing of Sahar Gul's abusers, but the law is still barely applied, according to a United Nations report published in November, and it has not been formally adopted.
 
Women's shelters are under threat, with a conservative justice minister describing them as "brothels," while a new family law that could make it easier for abused women to divorce is being held up.
 
In such a climate, the fear is that Sahar Gul's successful rescue may turn out to be an aberration rather than a new norm, and that it will not help those women whose suffering is not discovered.
 
"We have many cases perhaps graver than this where women are murdered," Ms. Zarifi said. "No one hears anything about them."

Source:
 http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/wed-and-tortured-at-13-afghan-girl-finds-rare-justice-253864
 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2012, 09:57:56 AM »



A woman who went to China's Changsha Central Hospital complaining of itching in the left side of her head was told by doctors that the source of irritation was a spider that had been living inside her ear canal for five days.
 
Doctors repor
tedly used a saline solution to flush out the spider in order to avoid having the spider burrow deeper inside the canal or bite her.
 
The flushing technique was successful and the woman reportedly wept with gratitude after being told the spider was removed. Doctors say they believe the spider entered the woman's home while the home was undergoing renovations, and crawled into her ear while she was sleeping.
 
A report by CNN states that spiders and other bugs are appearing in greater numbers this summer due to warm weather and drought conditions across the U.S.
 
"All insects are cold-blooded, so in extreme heat they develop quicker, which results in more generations popping up now compared to previous summers," Jim Fredericks, an entomologist and wildlife ecology expert with the National Pest Management Association, told the network.
 
Source:
 http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/doctors-remove-spider-hiding-woman-ear-canal-195029859.html
 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2012, 09:59:20 AM »


Chang Tzu Ping

 Chang Tzu Ping of China was born with a second face, consisting of a mouth with a rudimentary tongue and several teeth, a bristly patch of scalp, and vestiges of eyes, nose, and ears. The throat of the second mouth was impe
rforate and the lips could not move independently, but when Chang opened his mouth, the second mouth opened too. In his small village he was called 'Two-Faced Chang' and feared by local children, who thought him to be a monster. However, when he was around 40 years old, some American soldiers in China discovered him and brought him back to the United States. He had the second face removed surgically and returned to live the remainder of his life in his native village.
 
Source:
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chang_Tzu_Ping
 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2012, 12:14:09 PM »


Snake wine is an alcoholic beverage produced by infusing whole snakes in rice wine or grain alcohol. The drink was first recorded to have been consumed in China during the Western Zhou dynasty and considered an important curative and beli
eved to reinvigorate a person according to Traditional Chinese medicine. It can be found in China, Vietnam and throughout Southeast Asia.
 
The snakes, preferably venomous ones, are not usually preserved for their meat but to have their "essence" and snake venom dissolved in the liquor. However, the snake venom is denatured by the ethanol; its proteins are unfolded and therefore inactive.
 
The Huaxi street night market of Taipei, Taiwan, is renowned for its snake foods and wine products.

 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2012, 12:16:14 PM »


The Two-Headed Boy of Bengal was born in the village of Mundul Gait in Bengal in May of 1783 into a poor farming family. His remarkable life was very nearly extinguished immediately after his delivery as a terrified midwife tried to destroy
 the infant by throwing him into a fire.Miraculously, while he was rather badly burned about the eye, ear and upper head, he managed to survive. His parents began to exhibit him in Calcutta, where he attracted a great deal of attention and earned the family a fair amount of money. While the large crowds gathered to see the Two-Headed Boy his parents took to covering the lad with a sheet and often kept him hidden " sometimes for hours at a time and often in darkness.As his fame spread across India, so did the caliber of his observers. Several noblemen, civil servants and city officials arranged to showcase the boy in their own homes for both private gatherings and grand galas " treating their guests to up close examinations. One of these observers was a Colonel Pierce who described the encounter to the President of the Royal Society, Sir Joseph Banks and it was Sir Banks who later forwarded the account to the surgeon Everard Home.
 
The term ‹“Two-Headed may be a bit misleading as rather that two heads side by side, the Boy actually had head atop the other. When compared to the average child, both heads were of an appropriate size and development. The second head sat atop the main head inverted and simply ended in a neck-like stump. The second head seemed to, at times, function independently from the main head.When the boy cried or smiled the features of the second head did not always match. Yet, when the main head was fed, the second head would produce saliva.Furthermore, if the second head was presented with a breast to suckle " it would attemp to do so.While the main head was well formed the secondary head did posses some irregularities.The eyes and ears were underdeveloped.The tongue was small and the jaw malformed but both were capable of motion.When the Boy slept, the secondary head would often be observed alert and awake " eyes darting about.
 
Despite the attention the Boy of Bengal received, none of it was medical in nature.There were no intensive first hand medical examinations of the Boy on record and the vast majority of the press attention given to the Boy focused no on his condition, but rather his ‹“freakish appearance.The Boy, who seemed to suffer no serious ill effects in relation to his condition, died at the age of four from a cobra bite.It was only then, after much unseemly business, that medicine was able to examine the case.
 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2012, 12:17:51 PM »


A severely disfigured man in China has become the second person in the world to receive a partial face transplant. Experts predict the number of these operations will rise rapidly as centres around the world gear up to perform the procedure
.
 
Thirty-year-old Li Guoxing received a new upper lip, cheek and nose from a brain-dead donor to repair injuries sustained after an attack by a black bear (see image, below right), according to state media. He was reported to be in a stable condition and taking liquid food following the 13-hour surgery on Thursday at Xijing hospital in the central city of Xi'an, China.
 
"The surgery scar will not be obvious but there is a difference in the donor's and recipient's skin colour, so that will be noticeable," said Zhang Hui, the doctor in charge of post-surgery treatment, speaking to the China Daily newspaper. Having seen his reflection in a mirror, Guoxing is reportedly happy with his new face, which will be improved by further treatment over time.
 
Guoxing, a farmer, had become a recluse following the horrific bear attack in 2004. Doctors reportedly prepared for the transplant by practicing on rabbits, which were able to blink and move their faces after surgery.
 
Though this surgery was successful to some extent Li gouxing Died in the year 2008 as He dint take the prescribed medicines Properly and due to its side effects..
 
Source:
 http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9010-worlds-second-face-transplant-performed-in-china.html
 

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2012, 12:21:18 PM »

Charanjeet Singh Zira

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Re: Photos that shook the world
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2012, 12:23:00 PM »

Dede Koswara, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, returned home from hospital in August after six kilos of warts were surgically removed from his body and has been treated as an out-patient since.
 
Tree Man Dede pictured last year.
 His condition has worsened
 "Those (warts) that were removed are growing again and started to reappear after I returned home," he said, adding that for a time he could go fishing and use a cell phone but now needed assistance again for such activity.
 
An American doctor has previously said the warts were the result of severe Human Pappiloma Virus (HPV) infection, but the disease is not life-threatening. Doctors say his case is thought to be the worst of its type in the world.
 
The Discovery Channel recently made a documentary about Dede's affliction and his life.
 .Dede, 37, first noticed the warts on his body after cutting his knee as a teenager.
 
Over time, Dede was sacked from his job, deserted by his wife and shunned by neighbours as the horn-like extensions covered much of his body and stopped him working. He has two children.
 
"I'm not desperate but I want to recover," he added, speaking from his home in the remote West Java village of Tanjung Jaya.
 
An Indonesian doctor said he would have further operations at the end of December or early next year to remove and reduce warts.
 
"We have told him that his disease could not be 100 per cent cured. In the previous operation, we only tried to increase his quality of life," said Rachmat Dinata, one of a team of doctors treating him at the Hasan Sadikin hospital in Bandung, a city near his village.
 
Dinata said he would need at least two operations every year.
 
For a while, Dede was forced to take part in a circus act in Bandung in order to make ends meet.
 
But after his case received widespread publicity, donations from the public and government help allowed him to get treatment.
 
He has also been able to buy some land to grow rice and a second-hand car so his relatives can bring him to hospital.
 

 

 

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